eflfrog.com

About

Welcome to EFLfrog.com!

My name is John Bardos and I am the founder of the ABCfrog.com family of English teacher and learning websites.

Here you will find free materials, resources and ideas for teaching English to children. 90% of all the materials we create are completely free without any obligation of any kind. We do sell a Game Set just to help cover costs for artists and internet development but we think you will see that the price is very low relative to the value you receive. All the websites and resources in the ABCfrog.com family have been personally funded. We are still locked in a centuries old textbook mentality of language education and we hope to contribute to bringing language education into the 21st century.

Our focus is on EFL (English as a Foreign Language), but  most of the ideas and printable flash cards and games can also be used for ESL (English as a Second Language) classes.

EFL is NOT ESL

Teaching EFL is substantially different than ESL primarily because EFL students get so much less exposure to English. The way you teach a child with one hour a week of English exposure should be very different than an ESL student getting dozens of hours of English practice every week.

In EFL classes, textbook based classes are not effective. It is simply impossible to provide the amount of review in a variety of contexts necessary for children to internalize the language within the confines of the pages of a book. A different approach is required.  The focus of every class should be “What do my students need to learn next?” not “What is the next page in the textbook?” like most current EFL classes around the world.

The opposite danger of an overly rigid structure is to waste valuable class time with fun but essentially useless activities. The use of songs like Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star and Old McDonald had a Farm are warning signs that children are not getting effective English practice. When students are studying English less than one hour a week, extended arts and crafts activities like coloring name posters, making cutouts of animals, etc. are not giving students the English exposure they need. EFL classes can be fun and effective if suitable activities are chosen. Focus on vocabulary and expressions that are valuable for that particular stage of your students’ learning and make sure that English is used in real contexts. You will find that all of our materials focus on vocabulary that children need and want to use.

What is EFL2.0?

I coined the term EFL2.0 to describe a new way of teaching English in non-English speaking countries. Here are some central principles of EFL2.0:

* Classes should be planned with the students needs first, not the next page in a text book.
* Class time is precious and shouldn’t be wasted with ineffective activities.
* Dozens of repetitions in a variety of contexts are required to learn language targets.
* Students are intelligent and capable of learning on their own with the right motivation and direction from teachers and parents.
* With the Internet and fun multimedia based activities computers should play an integral role in homework and self-study.

Take a look at the FREE online games for your students on ABCfrog.com for fun English homework practice for children.

I hope you enjoy the resources. Please send feedback, comments or suggestions to:

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4 Responses to “About”
  1. on 29 Jan 2011 at 10:59 amsusana nakahara

    great flascards.pictures so cute

  2. on 06 Feb 2011 at 8:19 pmadmin

    Thanks Susana,

    I appreciate the comment. 🙂

  3. on 04 Oct 2011 at 2:44 amBill Randle

    Hello,
    I just discovered your website. I’m an American living in Brazil. I’m anxious to use some of your materials in my upcoming classes. You have confirmed many of my thoughts on the best approach and teaching methods. This is a wonderful website.
    I did notice one typo on the page http://eflfrog.com/blog/
    You say “Many English teachers can’t even produce the correct vowel sounds.

    I have found that most novice EFL teachers don’t know the short and long vowel sounds themselves. I had to memorize the sounds as well when I started teaching. Why should we hammer these phonetic sounds into children’s heads if their teachers are having trouble was well?” That would be “having trouble AS well.”
    Thanks,
    Bill

  4. on 27 Oct 2011 at 7:39 pmadmin

    Thanks Bill,

    I have made the edit.
    John

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